Qualifying for 0% Down

Qualifying for 0% Down

When bailing someone out of jail, you want to find every discount possible. After all, bail costs a lot of money here in California. While bail bonds do reduce the cost of bailing someone out of jail by 90%, they still cost a few thousands of dollars.

Most people don’t have that kind of money lying around when they learn of an arrest. This can make posting bail difficult. Discounts and payments can help make a big difference. That is why we here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles provide all of our clients with personalized payment plans. Qualified clients can be approved for 0% down on their payment plan.

All of our clients can get personal payment plans. These plans can be up to 2 years in length and will spread out the cost of the bail bond over several months. This reduces the upfront cost, making it more affordable for anyone looking to get their loved one out of jail right away.

Clients with approved credit can even qualify for a 0% down payment plan. This means that you would not have to make a payment on the bail bond until a month after your loved one has been released from jail. We find that this gives our clients the time they need to save up for the payment while still getting their loved one out of jail in a hurry.

Aside from making bail bonds affordable, we also provide the following for our clients:

• 24/7 Bail bond service
• 20% Discount
• Phone approvals
• 0% Interest payment plans
• No hidden fees
• No collateral with working signer
• Se habla Español

 
The need to bail someone out of jail can arise at any time, and it is often expensive. Luckily, with Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles helping you, posting bail can actually be affordable. Our payment plans make handling the cost of the bail bond easier, and qualifying for 0% down can make getting your loved one out of jail today possible.

Ready to get started? You can talk to an agent for free by calling 877-793-2254 or clicking Chat With Us now.

Read more >

Bail without Interest

Bail without Interest

Bailing a friend or family member out of jail is not something that most people have experience with. Unfortunately, people can get arrested at any time and a person may find themselves needing to bail out a loved one. When that happens, these people tend to have a lot of questions. One of the biggest questions is how much will it cost to bail the person out with a bail bond.

The answer to that question is dependent on what crime your loved one has been accused of. Different crimes receive different bail amounts. When it comes to the price of the bail bond that is dependent on the price of the bail. At Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail that they are for.

We can reduce the upfront cost of the bail bond by breaking it up and spreading it out over several months, up to 2 years. This way, instead of having to pay the full amount of the bail bond all at once, a person can take care of the cost in manageable chunks.

When it comes to payment plans, especially for large chunks of money, any interest rate can become very costly. That is why people worry about interest rates so much. Luckily for you, we do not charge interest on any of our bail bonds. Even our payment plans have 0% interest on them. This means that you only ever have to pay the cost of the bail bond and nothing more.

Some of the other services that we provide for our clients at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles include:

• 24/7 Bail bond service
• 20% Discount
• Phone approvals
• No hidden fees
• No collateral with working signer
• Se habla Español

 
Bailing someone out of jail can be a whole lot more affordable if you come to Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles for help. Our bonds only cost 10% of the bail they are for, and we let you pay them off with a 0% interest payment plan.

Are you looking to bail someone out of jail? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

Read more >

California Restraining Orders

California Restraining Orders

Everyone just wants to feel safe. Unfortunately, some people meet someone that does not let them feel safe when they are near. In some cases, just putting some distance between that other person is enough to get them to leave the other alone. Unfortunately, not everyone can take the hint.

Sometimes the person continues to bother the victim to the point that they seek legal help in the form of a restraining or protective order. No matter which term the person uses, the effect is the same. The other person is legally banned from communicating with or going anywhere near the victim for a set length of time.

What Is a Restraining Order?

A restraining order, or a protective order, is a court issued document that informs a proven abuser that they need to keep a certain distance away from their victim. The abuser has to keep away from the victim, and stay away from areas that the victim may frequent. The victim can even request to have it so the abuser cannot contact them through any means, including:

• Delivery of flowers or gifts.
• Over the phone.
• Through email.
• Through the mail.
• With a fax.
• With a text.

 
All of this is done in order to protect the victim and prevent more abuse from occurring.

Different Types of Restraining Orders

There are four different types of restraining orders here in the state of California. They are as follows:

Domestic Violence Restraining Order – Issued to people who have suffered abuse from intimate relationships.
Civil Harassment Restraining Order – Issued for people who have been harassed by people such as neighbors and co-workers, basically anyone the person isn’t close to.
Elder/Dependent Adult Abuse Restraining Order – Issued to protect elders over the age of 65 or adults between the ages of 18 and 64 who have certain disabilities.
Workplace Violence Restraining Order – Requested by an employer to protect an employee from another employee.

These restraining orders can all either be temporary or permanent, depending on the situation.

Penalties of Breaking a Restraining Order

Since restraining orders are meant to protect people, breaking a restraining order is taken very seriously. California Penal Code (PC) 273.6 makes it illegal for a person to not follow the instructions in a restraining order issued against them. The consequences of breaking this law are dependent on whether or not this is the first time the person has been charged with PC 273.6, how the person failed to adhere to the restraining order, and if the victim got hurt.

Typically, breaking PC 273.6 for the first time is a misdemeanor offense. In these instances, a person faces:

• A max fine of $1,000.
• Up to 1 year in county jail.

 
The judge on the case can also order any of the following:

• Mandatory counseling.
• Payments to a battered women’s shelter.
• Restitutions to the victim.

 
If the person has broken this law more than once, or the victim got hurt, the crime becomes a wobbler. This means it can be charged as either a misdemeanor or as a felony. If charged as a felony, the person faces 16 months, 2, or 3 years in state prison.

To Feel Safe

People just want to feel safe, and sometimes that means keeping certain people as far away from them as possible. This is what restraining orders are for. They instruct an abuser to stay away from their victim or else there will be consequences.

If a person wants to get a restraining order against someone, they need to get the proper paperwork. The papers can often be found at a local court or other law enforcement agency office. Once a person has the paperwork, just fill it out and submit it to the proper authorities.

What do you think of how California deals with restraining orders and the people who break them? Is the punishment for breaking a restraining order fair, or not enough?

Read more >

Driving with a Costume

Driving with a Costume

Arguably the biggest part of Halloween is dressing up in spooky, fun, or entertaining costumes. Both adults and kids alike get a kick out of dressing up as something else for the evening. The act of getting suited up can be a bit involved, especially for some costumes. As such, some people may decide to drive to their destination while fully decked out in their costume.

This may seem harmless, but it could be considered dangerous, or even reckless. Driving while in full costume can actually get a person into legal trouble if they are not careful.

What Is Reckless Driving?

Here in California, there may not be any law that specifically states that a person cannot drive while wearing a costume, however there is another law that could be applied to the situation. California Vehicle Code (VC) 23103 is the state’s reckless driving law.

As far as this law is concerned, a person commits reckless driving whenever they drive on a highway, this includes public roads, or in a parking facility with wanton disregard for the safety of people and property. Basically anytime a person drives in a way that could be considered dangerous, they are guilty of this crime.

While it may not seem like it, this law could apply to driving while wearing a costume. This is due to the fact that the costume can make it difficult for the driver to operate their vehicle safely. For instance, driving while wearing a mask can restrict a person’s view, making them less likely to notice pedestrians.

Loose or bulky outfits can also make driving difficult. Bulky costumes can prevent a person from moving properly to operate the vehicle, or accidentally bump something. Loose clothing can catch on switches and activate them without the driver meaning to.

If the costume starts to noticeably affect a person’s driving, a police officer will pull them over. Then the person will likely be charged with reckless driving. Even if the person’s driving isn’t noticeably affected by the costume, if they are pulled over, the officer could still charge them with reckless driving while wearing the costume.

Penalties of Reckless Driving in California

The penalties for reckless driving are dependent on whether or not the driver injured someone with their driving. If no one is injured, other than the driver themselves, then the person faces misdemeanor charges. These charges come with the following penalties:

• Up to 90 days in county jail.
• A max fine of $1,000.

 
When the driver causes severe bodily injury, then they face felony charges. As a felony charge, a person faces:

• 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
• A max fine of $10,000.

 
If the reckless driving leads to someone’s death, then the driver could face vehicular manslaughter charges under Penal Code (PC) 192.

Drive Safely This Halloween

Halloween is supposed to be fun. Dressing up as something spooky or a favorite character can be very entertaining. Unfortunately, if a person is not careful and decides to drive while wearing their costume, they could get into legal trouble here in California. That is the last thing anyone wants to happen on Halloween, so it is best to drive carefully and only do so without a mask or bulky, loose-fitting costumes.

What do you think of California’s reckless driving law and how it can be applied to driving while in costume? Is this too ridiculous, or is it a good idea that can keep people safe?

Read more >

Questions about Payments

Questions about Payments

When it comes to bailing someone out of jail, most people have a lot of questions. Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we have heard, and answered, all sorts of questions. The part of bail that causes the most concern amongst our clients, is paying for it. People have a lot of questions relating to paying for a bail bond, and so we’ve compiled a list of those questions, and their answers, to make things easier for you.

How much does a bail bond cost? How much a bail bond costs is dependent on how much your loved one’s bail is set at. Our bail bonds cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that a $20,000 bail will have a $2,000 bail bond.

Are there any discounts? Yes, we do offer discounts for qualified clients. If one of the co-signers for the bail bond is a member of the military, a member of AARP, a union member, owns a home, or has a private attorney, then the person can get 20% off the price of the bail bond.

How do I make payments? We accept a number of different payment options to make paying for the bail bond easier. We accept cash, checks, credit cards, Western Union money transfers, E-checks, and Wells Fargo Business Account deposits. These payments can be made in person, online, over the phone, or even through the mail in some instances.

How much do I have to pay upfront? That is dependent on how big the bail is, and who the co-signers for the bail bond are. A smaller bail can lead to smaller monthly and down payments. Having good co-signers is another way to shrink the size of the payments.

How much is interest? 0%. We do not charge interest on our bail bonds.

Do I need collateral? In most cases, all we need for collateral is the signature of a working co-signer. If we have that, most times we won’t need any other type of collateral.

What happens if I miss a payment? We understand that life can get difficult at times, and so a missed payment is bound to happen. If you know in advanced that you are going to miss a payment, talk to one of our agents. We will be more than willing to work with you.

Paying for someone’s bail may seem intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. At Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we do everything that we can to make paying for the bail bond as easy as possible.

If you have more questions about bail or bail bonds, feel free to get in touch with one of our agents. They are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and consultations are always free. There is no reason not to talk to one of our professional bail agents.

Are you ready to get started? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

Read more >

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost Though?

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost?

One of the biggest questions people have when it comes to bailing someone out of jail is: how much is this going to cost? The answer to that varies from case to case. If a person is tackling the bail on their own, then it will probably cost several thousands of dollars. If the person gets a bail bond from Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, then it will cost significantly less.

Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, our bonds only cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that when our clients come to us for help, they get a 90% discount off the price of the bail. This can take the cost of a $20,000 bail and turn it into a much more affordable $2,000 bail bond. Who wouldn’t want a discount like this?

Aside from that discount, which all of our clients get, we also have other ways of reducing the cost of bailing someone out. For instance, we provide all of our clients with affordable, 0% interest payment plans. This breaks up the cost of the bail bond and spreads it out over several months.

We also offer special discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can qualify for 0% down on their bail bond. This means they don’t have pay for the bail bond until a month after their loved one has been released. We also provide a 20% discount of the price of the bail bond for clients and co-signers who:

• Are union members.
• Are members of the military.
• Are members of AARP.
• Are homeowners.
• Have private attorneys.

 
So long as a co-signer meets just one of those requirements, they can qualify for that discount.

While how much does a bail bond cost should be a simple questions to answer, it is hard to give a good answer without knowing the specifics of the case. Luckily, our bail agents are available to offer free consultations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our bail agents will be more than happy to answer all of your questions about bail.

If you want to know how much a bail bond will cost for your loved one, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

Read more >

California Loitering Laws

California Loitering Laws

Pretty much everyone has seen a sign telling people that loitering is prohibited in a certain area. However, not everyone knows or understands exactly what loitering means. On top of that, how much trouble can a person actually get into for loitering? Is it a big deal? The answer to that depends on how exactly the person was loitering.

Laws on Loitering Here in California

For those who don’t know, loitering is the act of lingering in a private or public place for no apparent reason. The key to this definition is that the person has no reason to be in the area. This means that if a person is hanging out waiting for someone, they are not actually loitering, even if it may appear that way to someone else.

Most businesses don’t like loiterers because they can scare off potential customers, but as it turns out, the act of loitering in and of itself is not a crime in the state of California. However, if the person is attempting to do something else while loitering, they can get into some legal trouble.

There are 5 different state laws that are concerned about loitering:

PC 303a “Loitering to solicit the purchase of alcohol” – It is a crime for a person to ask people to buy alcohol for them, especially when they’ve been cut off from a bar or are a minor.
PC 416 “Failing to disperse” – Failing to leave a place after being ordered to do so by a police officer is a type of loitering that can get a person in trouble. This is due to the fact that the officer has asked/ordered the person to leave and they have failed to do so.
Penal Code (PC) 602 “Trespassing” – Entering and lingering on someone else’s property without their permission can be seen as a type of loitering that can get a person into trouble.
PC 652b “Loitering at a school” – It is a crime to loiter at a school, or any other place where children often get together, if a person has no reason to be at that location, or they are planning to commit a crime such as kidnapping.
PC 653.22 “Loitering with intent to commit prostitution” – This one is pretty self-explanatory. Prostitution is illegal and so hanging around a place to commit prostitution is also illegal.

Basically, any time a person is hanging out in an area with the intent of committing a crime that is why they can get into trouble for loitering. It is the crime the person is planning to do that gets them into trouble, not so much the act of loitering.

Penalties for Loitering

If a person is accused of breaking any of the above loitering laws, they face misdemeanor charges. This means that a person faces the following penalties:

• Up to 6 months in county jail.
• A max fine of $1,000.
• Misdemeanor probation.

 
Most of the time, loitering isn’t a big deal, and as such, the consequences for the various loitering crimes are relatively light.

The Intent to Commit a Crime Is Illegal.

While hanging around a place for no apparent reason is not a crime, doing so with the intent of committing a crime is illegal. It is the intent a person has that can get them into trouble. As long as a person has a reason to be in an area, and hasn’t been asked to leave, they are typically within their rights to stay there.

What do you think about California’s laws surrounding loitering? Are they fair, or are they too small for the crime?

Read more >

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

When it comes to interacting with the police, it is often wise to do as they say. Resisting or arguing with them will often only lead to more trouble than people want to deal with. So, unless a person wants to end up in some trouble with law enforcement, then they should probably do whatever an officer asks them.

However, California law has recently changed in one aspect of doing what officers ask. It used to be that if a law enforcement officer asked a person to help them with something, such as arresting another individual, that person had to agree. If they didn’t, they could end up in trouble with the law. However, thanks to the recent passing of a State Senate Bill, that is no longer the case.

A Law from the Wild West

Back in the days of the Wild West, the state of California enacted the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. The law was enacted to help sheriffs create posses to hunt down escaped prisoners or other criminals. The law stated that any able-bodied person 18 or older has to help an officer with an arrest if the officer requests assistance from the person. Failing to do so is a misdemeanor offense that could come with a max fine of $1,000.

The law is nearly 150 years old, and that caused some people to take notice of it. Specifically, Senator Bob Hertzberg and his interns. They deemed the law too old and outdated to still be a law today. That is why, back in January of 2019, the Senator introduced Senate Bill (SB) 192.

Senator Hertzberg was quoted as saying: “Thank you to my interns for finding a law that belongs in the history books, not the law books.”
At the start of September, Governor Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law, which officially repealed the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. This means that it is no longer illegal for an adult to refuse to help a police officer during an arrest if the officer asks for help.

The Ongoing Debate

Of course, like with any law these days, there is some debate to this new law and the message it sends. Many law enforcement agencies here in the state of California fear that this bill’s passing will make people think they don’t have to listen to police officers.

On the other side of things, there is the Senator and his team who seem to think that the law is old and outdated. They think that no one should be forced to help a police officer just because the officer asked them to do so.

What do you think about the recent passing and signing of SB 192? Should California have gotten rid of the law because it was old and outdated, or was it a good idea to make sure people provide help to law enforcement officers who need it?

Read more >

Don’t Let Bail Ruin Your Day

Don’t Let Bail Ruin Your Day

One call can ruin your day. Finding out that someone you care about has been arrested is horrible. Luckily, one phone call is all it takes to fix the problem too. Just talk to the professionals here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. For over 30 years we have helped Californians face bail. We can help you too.

Since Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles’s founding in 1987, we have helped thousands of clients face bail. With all of their years of training, our bail agents know everything about bail. With just a small bit of information about your loved one, our agents can answer all of your questions. All they need to get started is your loved one’s name, birthday, and county of arrest.

Once our agents have that information in hand, they can locate your loved one in the county database. There they can get the rest of the information they need and find the details on the arrest itself. This allows our agents to simultaneously answer your questions and fill out the paperwork for the bail bond.

When it comes to the bond itself, our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail that they are for. This means you get a 90% discount just by coming to us. On top of this discount, we create personalized payment plans for all of our clients. This helps reduce the upfront cost of bailing someone out of jail, making it much more manageable.

• 24/7 Bail bond service
• 20% Discount
• Phone approvals
• 0% Interest payment plans
• No hidden fees
• No collateral with working signer
• Se habla Español

 
Signing for the bail bond is a piece of cake. So long as one of the co-signers for the bond is working, then we can use that signature as collateral. Plus, with Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, you will never have to worry about hidden fees. The price we tell you is the price you will pay. We never try to milk more money out of our clients.

Don’t let your day be ruined. Make it better by contacting Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles at 877-793-2254 or by clicking Chat With Us now.

Read more >

Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

When it comes to handling large expenses, people like to have options. This is especially true when it comes to bail. Even the cheapest bails in California cost several thousands of dollars. This is well out of reach of the average Californian. Luckily, there is a way to not only make bailing someone out of jail cheaper, but more affordable as well. All you have to do is contact Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles.

We have helped thousands of Californians deal with bail since our founding in 1987. Let us help you too. Coming to us for help means that you will only have to pay a fraction of the full bail price. This is due to the fact that our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail. This makes the bail bond a whole lot cheaper.

Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles we know that everyone is different. Things that work well for one person may not work well for others. That is why we accept a variety of payment options. We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards. On top of that, our clients can make their payments online, in person, over the phone, or through the mail. They can use whichever methods work best for them.

On top of that, we provide discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can get their bail bond for 0% down. This way, they don’t have to make a payment until a month after their loved one’s release. Some clients can get an additional 20% off the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers:

• Is a union member.
• Is a military member.
• Is a member of AARP.
• Is a homeowner.
• Has a private attorney.

 
Paying for bail may initially seem like an impossible task, but it doesn’t have to be. Just contact Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. We provide our clients with cheap bail bonds and options that make the bail bond more affordable too.

Do you need bail help? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

Read more >