Questions about Payments

Questions about Payments

When it comes to bailing someone out of jail, most people have a lot of questions. Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we have heard, and answered, all sorts of questions. The part of bail that causes the most concern amongst our clients, is paying for it. People have a lot of questions relating to paying for a bail bond, and so we’ve compiled a list of those questions, and their answers, to make things easier for you.

How much does a bail bond cost? How much a bail bond costs is dependent on how much your loved one’s bail is set at. Our bail bonds cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that a $20,000 bail will have a $2,000 bail bond.

Are there any discounts? Yes, we do offer discounts for qualified clients. If one of the co-signers for the bail bond is a member of the military, a member of AARP, a union member, owns a home, or has a private attorney, then the person can get 20% off the price of the bail bond.

How do I make payments? We accept a number of different payment options to make paying for the bail bond easier. We accept cash, checks, credit cards, Western Union money transfers, E-checks, and Wells Fargo Business Account deposits. These payments can be made in person, online, over the phone, or even through the mail in some instances.

How much do I have to pay upfront? That is dependent on how big the bail is, and who the co-signers for the bail bond are. A smaller bail can lead to smaller monthly and down payments. Having good co-signers is another way to shrink the size of the payments.

How much is interest? 0%. We do not charge interest on our bail bonds.

Do I need collateral? In most cases, all we need for collateral is the signature of a working co-signer. If we have that, most times we won’t need any other type of collateral.

What happens if I miss a payment? We understand that life can get difficult at times, and so a missed payment is bound to happen. If you know in advanced that you are going to miss a payment, talk to one of our agents. We will be more than willing to work with you.

Paying for someone’s bail may seem intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. At Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we do everything that we can to make paying for the bail bond as easy as possible.

If you have more questions about bail or bail bonds, feel free to get in touch with one of our agents. They are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and consultations are always free. There is no reason not to talk to one of our professional bail agents.

Are you ready to get started? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost Though?

How Much Does a Bail Bond Cost?

One of the biggest questions people have when it comes to bailing someone out of jail is: how much is this going to cost? The answer to that varies from case to case. If a person is tackling the bail on their own, then it will probably cost several thousands of dollars. If the person gets a bail bond from Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, then it will cost significantly less.

Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, our bonds only cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that when our clients come to us for help, they get a 90% discount off the price of the bail. This can take the cost of a $20,000 bail and turn it into a much more affordable $2,000 bail bond. Who wouldn’t want a discount like this?

Aside from that discount, which all of our clients get, we also have other ways of reducing the cost of bailing someone out. For instance, we provide all of our clients with affordable, 0% interest payment plans. This breaks up the cost of the bail bond and spreads it out over several months.

We also offer special discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can qualify for 0% down on their bail bond. This means they don’t have pay for the bail bond until a month after their loved one has been released. We also provide a 20% discount of the price of the bail bond for clients and co-signers who:

• Are union members.
• Are members of the military.
• Are members of AARP.
• Are homeowners.
• Have private attorneys.

 
So long as a co-signer meets just one of those requirements, they can qualify for that discount.

While how much does a bail bond cost should be a simple questions to answer, it is hard to give a good answer without knowing the specifics of the case. Luckily, our bail agents are available to offer free consultations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our bail agents will be more than happy to answer all of your questions about bail.

If you want to know how much a bail bond will cost for your loved one, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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California Loitering Laws

California Loitering Laws

Pretty much everyone has seen a sign telling people that loitering is prohibited in a certain area. However, not everyone knows or understands exactly what loitering means. On top of that, how much trouble can a person actually get into for loitering? Is it a big deal? The answer to that depends on how exactly the person was loitering.

Laws on Loitering Here in California

For those who don’t know, loitering is the act of lingering in a private or public place for no apparent reason. The key to this definition is that the person has no reason to be in the area. This means that if a person is hanging out waiting for someone, they are not actually loitering, even if it may appear that way to someone else.

Most businesses don’t like loiterers because they can scare off potential customers, but as it turns out, the act of loitering in and of itself is not a crime in the state of California. However, if the person is attempting to do something else while loitering, they can get into some legal trouble.

There are 5 different state laws that are concerned about loitering:

PC 303a “Loitering to solicit the purchase of alcohol” – It is a crime for a person to ask people to buy alcohol for them, especially when they’ve been cut off from a bar or are a minor.
PC 416 “Failing to disperse” – Failing to leave a place after being ordered to do so by a police officer is a type of loitering that can get a person in trouble. This is due to the fact that the officer has asked/ordered the person to leave and they have failed to do so.
Penal Code (PC) 602 “Trespassing” – Entering and lingering on someone else’s property without their permission can be seen as a type of loitering that can get a person into trouble.
PC 652b “Loitering at a school” – It is a crime to loiter at a school, or any other place where children often get together, if a person has no reason to be at that location, or they are planning to commit a crime such as kidnapping.
PC 653.22 “Loitering with intent to commit prostitution” – This one is pretty self-explanatory. Prostitution is illegal and so hanging around a place to commit prostitution is also illegal.

Basically, any time a person is hanging out in an area with the intent of committing a crime that is why they can get into trouble for loitering. It is the crime the person is planning to do that gets them into trouble, not so much the act of loitering.

Penalties for Loitering

If a person is accused of breaking any of the above loitering laws, they face misdemeanor charges. This means that a person faces the following penalties:

• Up to 6 months in county jail.
• A max fine of $1,000.
• Misdemeanor probation.

 
Most of the time, loitering isn’t a big deal, and as such, the consequences for the various loitering crimes are relatively light.

The Intent to Commit a Crime Is Illegal.

While hanging around a place for no apparent reason is not a crime, doing so with the intent of committing a crime is illegal. It is the intent a person has that can get them into trouble. As long as a person has a reason to be in an area, and hasn’t been asked to leave, they are typically within their rights to stay there.

What do you think about California’s laws surrounding loitering? Are they fair, or are they too small for the crime?

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You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

You Don’t Have to Help an Officer

When it comes to interacting with the police, it is often wise to do as they say. Resisting or arguing with them will often only lead to more trouble than people want to deal with. So, unless a person wants to end up in some trouble with law enforcement, then they should probably do whatever an officer asks them.

However, California law has recently changed in one aspect of doing what officers ask. It used to be that if a law enforcement officer asked a person to help them with something, such as arresting another individual, that person had to agree. If they didn’t, they could end up in trouble with the law. However, thanks to the recent passing of a State Senate Bill, that is no longer the case.

A Law from the Wild West

Back in the days of the Wild West, the state of California enacted the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. The law was enacted to help sheriffs create posses to hunt down escaped prisoners or other criminals. The law stated that any able-bodied person 18 or older has to help an officer with an arrest if the officer requests assistance from the person. Failing to do so is a misdemeanor offense that could come with a max fine of $1,000.

The law is nearly 150 years old, and that caused some people to take notice of it. Specifically, Senator Bob Hertzberg and his interns. They deemed the law too old and outdated to still be a law today. That is why, back in January of 2019, the Senator introduced Senate Bill (SB) 192.

Senator Hertzberg was quoted as saying: “Thank you to my interns for finding a law that belongs in the history books, not the law books.”
At the start of September, Governor Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law, which officially repealed the California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872. This means that it is no longer illegal for an adult to refuse to help a police officer during an arrest if the officer asks for help.

The Ongoing Debate

Of course, like with any law these days, there is some debate to this new law and the message it sends. Many law enforcement agencies here in the state of California fear that this bill’s passing will make people think they don’t have to listen to police officers.

On the other side of things, there is the Senator and his team who seem to think that the law is old and outdated. They think that no one should be forced to help a police officer just because the officer asked them to do so.

What do you think about the recent passing and signing of SB 192? Should California have gotten rid of the law because it was old and outdated, or was it a good idea to make sure people provide help to law enforcement officers who need it?

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Don’t Let Bail Ruin Your Day

Don’t Let Bail Ruin Your Day

One call can ruin your day. Finding out that someone you care about has been arrested is horrible. Luckily, one phone call is all it takes to fix the problem too. Just talk to the professionals here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. For over 30 years we have helped Californians face bail. We can help you too.

Since Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles’s founding in 1987, we have helped thousands of clients face bail. With all of their years of training, our bail agents know everything about bail. With just a small bit of information about your loved one, our agents can answer all of your questions. All they need to get started is your loved one’s name, birthday, and county of arrest.

Once our agents have that information in hand, they can locate your loved one in the county database. There they can get the rest of the information they need and find the details on the arrest itself. This allows our agents to simultaneously answer your questions and fill out the paperwork for the bail bond.

When it comes to the bond itself, our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail that they are for. This means you get a 90% discount just by coming to us. On top of this discount, we create personalized payment plans for all of our clients. This helps reduce the upfront cost of bailing someone out of jail, making it much more manageable.

• 24/7 Bail bond service
• 20% Discount
• Phone approvals
• 0% Interest payment plans
• No hidden fees
• No collateral with working signer
• Se habla Español

 
Signing for the bail bond is a piece of cake. So long as one of the co-signers for the bond is working, then we can use that signature as collateral. Plus, with Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, you will never have to worry about hidden fees. The price we tell you is the price you will pay. We never try to milk more money out of our clients.

Don’t let your day be ruined. Make it better by contacting Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles at 877-793-2254 or by clicking Chat With Us now.

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Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

When it comes to handling large expenses, people like to have options. This is especially true when it comes to bail. Even the cheapest bails in California cost several thousands of dollars. This is well out of reach of the average Californian. Luckily, there is a way to not only make bailing someone out of jail cheaper, but more affordable as well. All you have to do is contact Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles.

We have helped thousands of Californians deal with bail since our founding in 1987. Let us help you too. Coming to us for help means that you will only have to pay a fraction of the full bail price. This is due to the fact that our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail. This makes the bail bond a whole lot cheaper.

Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles we know that everyone is different. Things that work well for one person may not work well for others. That is why we accept a variety of payment options. We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards. On top of that, our clients can make their payments online, in person, over the phone, or through the mail. They can use whichever methods work best for them.

On top of that, we provide discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can get their bail bond for 0% down. This way, they don’t have to make a payment until a month after their loved one’s release. Some clients can get an additional 20% off the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers:

• Is a union member.
• Is a military member.
• Is a member of AARP.
• Is a homeowner.
• Has a private attorney.

 
Paying for bail may initially seem like an impossible task, but it doesn’t have to be. Just contact Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. We provide our clients with cheap bail bonds and options that make the bail bond more affordable too.

Do you need bail help? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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California’s Seat Belt Laws

California’s Seat Belt Laws

Every driver has seen a sign telling them and their passengers to buckle their seat belts. Most people don’t need to be reminded to buckle up. They know that wearing their seat belt is the best way to stay safe in the event of an accident. However, there are still some people out there who need to be reminded of that fact.

In an effort to try to keep everyone safe, every state in the union has created laws against driving without a seat belt. Here in California, Vehicle Code (VC) 27315 is the state’s seat belt law. It lists the times when a person needs to wear a seat belt and what kind of consequences a person would face for not wearing the belt.

California Vehicle Code 27315

VC 27315 is more commonly referred to as the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. This act was created in an effort to keep motorists safe while driving across California. The act basically states that no person over the age of 16 can ride or drive in a moving vehicle without being properly restrained.

Being properly restrained is defined as having the lower lap portion strapped over the stomach and the upper shoulder portion of the belt being strapped across the front of the chest. Basically, for any vehicle from the year 1996 or newer, passengers have to wear the full seat belt. A person cannot place the shoulder portion of the seat belt behind their back.

Another factor in this law is that all seat belts need to be kept in proper, working order.

Consequences of Not Buckling Up

Breaking VC 27315 is an infraction level offense. This means it does not come with criminal charges or jail time. A person simply faces a small fine for not wearing their seat belt while riding in a moving vehicle.

When a person doesn’t wear their seat belt, they will be the ones to get a ticket, not the driver of the vehicle. Unless the un-belted person is a minor, in which case the driver is responsible for the child’s safety.

For a first time offense, a person faces a $20 base fine.

For any subsequent offenses, a person faces a $50 base fine.

In some instances, a person may be able to avoid a fine if they can take a traffic school course, provided the course teaches about seat belt safety.

Despite the nature of breaking this law, a person will not receive any points on their driver’s license. This helps a person avoid collecting too many points on their license and the increased insurance rates that would come with them.

It is important to remember that all of these consequences are on top of the fact that if a person doesn’t wear a seat belt and winds up in an accident, they are much more likely to receive serious injuries. Seat belts save lives. By not wearing one, a person is risking their own life.

Kids and Seat Belts

It is pretty easy to see how seat belts aren’t exactly designed for children. That is why there are car seats built to keep kids safe at all ages. According to California law:

• Kids under the age of 2 should be restrained in rear-facing car seats unless the child weighs more than 40 pounds, or is taller than 40 inches.
• Children under the age of 8 must be secured in a car seat in the back seat.
• Children 8 and older, or taller than 4 feet, 9 inches, should be in a booster seat, or at least secured by a seat belt.
• Children 16 and older must wear a seat belt.

 
Failing to follow these regulations can result in the parent receiving fines, and a point on their driver’s license.

A first time offense comes with a base fine of $100.

Subsequent offenses come with a base fine of $250.

Don’t Ignore the Ticket

With such a small ticket price, some people may feel like ignoring the ticket and its court date. However, that is a terrible idea. By ignoring a ticket and failing to appear in court, a person violates VC 40508. Unlike VC 27315, breaking VC 40508 comes with actual criminal charges.

When a person breaks this law, they can face:

• Up to 6 months in jail.
• A max fine of $1,000.

 

Just Wear the Seat Belt

At the end of the day, it is best that everyone just buckle up when they get in a vehicle. Doing so can keep them safe in the event of an accident. Plus, getting caught not wearing a seat belt can earn a person a nice fine, and they will have to appear in court. It is so much easier to just wear the seat belt.

What do you think of California’s take on seat belt laws? Is it too much, or not enough? Should driving without a seat belt earn a person a point on their driver’s license?

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Minors Breaking the Law

Minors Breaking the Law

Everyone knows that kids get into trouble. Luckily, for the most part, kids tend to only get in trouble with their parents. As long as parents keep an eye on their children, and play an active role in the child’s life, the kid is less likely to wind up in serious trouble. However, that is not always the case. Sometimes kids mess up in a big way, and find themselves on the wrong side of the law.

Finding out that a child has broken a law is a terrible situation for a parent to deal with. No parent ever wants to answer the front door, or a phone, to learn that their child is in some serious trouble. While rare, this does happen from time to time. As such, a parent should be aware of what happens when a minor has a run in with law enforcement agents.

How the Law Handles Juveniles

When a minor gets in trouble with the law, officers react a little differently. In most cases, minors receive lesser penalties for crimes than an adult would. Still, there are times when a minor could find themselves locked up.

What happens to a minor who broke the law is largely dependent on the crime itself. If the charge is relatively minor, then the child will likely be allowed to go home, or be escorted home. Most of the time, the law prefers that parents take care of the children themselves. However, that is not always an option.

If things are a little more serious, then the minor may be given a summons to appear in court at a later date. If things are real bad, then the minor may be arrested and taken to juvenile hall.

Juvenile Hall

Just because a minor is taken to juvenile hall does not mean that they will be forced to stay there forever. This isn’t the end of the world.

A probation officer will look at the case and decide how to proceed. The officer can do one of the following:

• Give the minor a citation to appear in court and send him/her home.
• Place the minor on probation, which allows them to go home and avoid going to court, unless they continue to misbehave.
• Hold the minor in juvenile hall until a judge can look at the case.

 

Minors in Court

When dealing with courts, minors go to a separate court that focuses solely on minors. If a child has to go to a hearing in court, they could be going for any of the following reasons:

• Detention Hearing. This will determine if the child needs to stay in juvenile hall or not.
• Transfer Hearing. This will determine if the case will stay at this level, or be moved up to an adult court.
• Adjudication. This is the actual trial held in front of a judge, without a jury.
• Disposition Hearing. If the juvenile is found guilty, this is where they receive their sentencing.

 
Despite the fact that these court hearings are for minors, they are still very serious. A person should treat these hearings the exact same way they would any other court appearances. This means a person, especially the minor, should dress appropriately and behave while in the court.

Consequences of Court

The goal of the juvenile delinquency system is to rehabilitate minors and to help mold them into good, well-behaved individuals. As such, judges have a lot of options when it comes to sentencing any minor that is found guilty.

What is likely the best case scenario for a guilty verdict, is probation. This means the minor is able to go home. They just have to be on their best behavior to ensure they don’t receive a worse punishment. Some common probation conditions can include:

• A curfew.
• Going to counseling.
• Going to school.
• Making restitutions to the victims.
• Performing community service.

 
A worst case scenario would be when a judge determines that a child is better off away from their home. The child could become a ward of the state, which is where the state takes responsibility for the child. The minor could be placed into a probation camp, or into California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. Neither of these are great outcomes.

Be a Part of Your Child’s Life

No parent ever wants their child to have to face hardship, and getting into trouble with the law definitely counts as hardship. Luckily, a child has to screw up pretty majorly in order to wind up in juvenile hall. So long as a parent takes an active role in their kid’s life, they should be able to prevent that from ever happening.

When kids have guidance, they are able to make better choices, and therefore are less likely to end up getting into trouble in the first place. That is why parents need to pay attention to their kids. If they don’t, their child could make a bad choice and find him or herself in juvie.

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Exercising Really Is Good for You

Exercising Really Is Good for You

If you were to ask someone for a way to stay healthy, there’s a good chance he or she would tell you to exercise. Many people believe that having a more active lifestyle is the key to staying healthy, both physically and mentally. As it turns out, these people are right. A recent study has proven this fact, at least somewhat.

Several studies have established the fact that getting some exercise in each week can increase a person’s overall mood and physical health. Exercising has been shown to alleviate, and even prevent depression. A new study that was just published in Lancet Psychiatry says that just two hours of physical activity a week is all it takes to see these kinds of results.

This new discovery makes the thought of exercising a lot easier for many people. In fact, that’s just 24 minutes a day, 5 days a week. That is much more manageable for people with very busy schedules.

Of course, as with any good thing, there is a point where it becomes too much. The study found that there is a limit to the positive gains that a person can receive from exercising. The sweet spot seems to be anywhere between 2 to 6 hours a week. The theory is that people who excessively or obsessively exercise may be suffering from mental health problems, which is why they exercise so much.

Regardless, it is safe to say that exercising is good for you. Not only does it help keep your body in shape, it can help your mind out as well. If you don’t have loads of time to devote to exercising, do not worry. If you can squeeze in around 25 minutes of any physical activity, every weekday, you will be well on you way to living a happier, healthier lifestyle.

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What Is the Best Meal of the Day?

What Is the Best Meal of the Day?

As summer comes to a close, kids are bracing for their inevitable return to school. Their days of sleeping in and relaxing will be over. In their place will be stress-filled, drowsy mornings that lead to long lectures. In the chaos of getting ready in the morning, it can be easy to forget out what is arguably the most important meal of the day.

Everyone has heard that breakfast is the most important meal, and many studies have proven that this is true. Breakfast is the first meal a person has after roughly 8 hours of fasting. In order for your body to wake up and be able to focus on anything, it needs energy. Breakfast helps refill your energy and gives you a jumpstart for the rest of the day.

Eating breakfast in the morning, which should occur sometime within the first two hours after waking up, has many benefits. It can improve memory and concentration, which is very important for kids who are heading off to a day of learning. Eating breakfast can also make us happier, so you aren’t feeling hangry, and can reduce stress. All of this can combine to mean better grades for students.

Growing children need a lot of energy to stay active, and they can get a lot of that required energy from having breakfast. It is estimated that boys between the ages of 7 and 10 should consume roughly 1970 kcals per day. Girls within the same age range should consume about 1740 kcals per day.

As hard as it can be to fit in in the early hours before school, it is important to always make time for breakfast. Doing so can put everyone in a better mood and help your kids be more attentive and prepared for the school day. If you want what is best your kids, then you should consider providing them with a good breakfast every morning.

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