What Are Co-Signers and What Do They Do?

What Are Co-Signers and What Do They Do?

You can’t be expected to know everything about a subject or service that you have never used before. Nowhere is this fact truer than when it comes to bail. Most people have never dealt with bail before, and so they have lots of questions about the process. That is why Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles is here to help.

One topic that has been known to cause confusion amongst clients, is co-signers. What are they, and who can be one? It is actually a really simple term. A co-signer is anyone who is willing to sign the bail bond to get their friend or family member out of jail. They are called co-signers when there is more than one person willing to sign.

Anyone who wants to help rescue their loved one from jail can become a co-signer. However, it is recommended to find people who have good credit or meet other requirements, as this can help make paying for the bail easier for everyone. For instance, at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles we offer a 20% discount on the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers meets just one of the following:

• Is a member of a union.
• Is a member of the military.
• Is a member of AARP.
• Is a homeowner.
• Has a private attorney.

 
By becoming a co-signer for a bail bond, a person is taking partial responsibility of the bail bond. This means it is up to them to make sure payments are made on time. They are also responsible for making sure their loved one goes to all of his or her court dates. Lastly, they will be responsible for making sure their loved one stays out of trouble. After all, they don’t want him or her to get arrested again.

When you have questions about any aspect of the bail process, you can always count on Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. Our bail agents are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They will always be ready to answer your questions.

Still have questions about bail? Talk to an agent for free by calling 877-793-2254 or clicking Chat With Us now.

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Beware of Porch Pirates and Package Theft

Beware of Porch Pirates and Package Theft

One of the nicest benefits of living in today’s modern world is that pretty much anything can be ordered online and delivered to a person’s home. This allows people to buy things they want or need without ever having to leave the house. This ability is very useful. However, as with all good things, there are those people out there that have to ruin it for everybody.

There are always people looking to make a quick and easy buck, and that is exactly what porch pirates are. They take advantage of people’s orders being left out in the open and claim them for themselves. This problem only becomes more prominent as the holiday season draws nearer and people begin ordering more things online.

What Are Porch Pirates?

Porch pirate is a name for anyone who steals a delivered package from somebody’s front porch or yard. More often than not, these kind of thefts are crimes of opportunity. The person just happened to be walking, or even driving, by and they saw the package, or letter then decide in a moment to take it. They have no idea what could be inside, but they want it for themselves.

Of course, there are some people who have turned this kind of behavior into their day job. They will spend their days scouring through neighborhoods looking for unattended packages that are just waiting to be taken. They steal the packages and either keep the contents for themselves or sell them to someone else to make a profit.

Either way, one can easily see why this crime can be so distressing and upsetting for the victim, especially around Christmas time when the package could have been a gift for someone else.

Tips to Avoid Porch Pirates

Everyone wants to avoid falling victim to a porch pirate, especially during the holiday season. Luckily, there are a few different ways to reduce the chances of having a package stolen.

• Amazon now has a service that allows for delivery inside a home. A person just unlocks their front door with an app on their phone so the delivery person can put the package in a safe place. They also have a similar thing for delivering inside a person’s car.
• Have a trusted friend, neighbor, or family member who is home during the day get the package off the porch while at work.
• Have packages delivered to work. If your workplace allows this, your packages will be delivered and watched over until you can pick it up.
• Make sure someone will be home to answer the door and receive the package. By getting it off the porch, it is far less likely to be stolen.
• Require a signature for the delivery. This ensures that the package isn’t left alone.
• Set up a security camera aimed at the porch to help deter thefts in the first place. If a theft does occur, their will at least be video evidence of the culprit and their illegal act.
• Some delivery companies, such as UPS, allow for customers to leave delivery instructions, such as hiding the package in a shed, instead of leaving it on a front porch.
• The USPS provides a service called USPS Package Intercept that allows customers to change delivery destinations before the package has been sent out for final delivery.
• UPS has a service called UPS My Choice that alerts a customer to a delivery the day before and allows them to change the time or location of the delivery for a small fee.
• UPS, FedEx, and Amazon offer services where packages can be delivered to secure locations such as an office, warehouse, or locker. This way the package is safe until the customer comes to pick it up.

 

Penalties for Mail Theft

Stealing another person’s mail is illegal under both federal and state law. United States Code (USC) 1708 defines how mail can be stolen, and then lists how states should punish offenders of this crime. In a very long and descriptive way, the law basically states that anyone who knowingly takes someone else’s mail without permission to do so is guilty of mail theft. This law also defines what counts as mail, and includes the following items:

• Letters.
• Postcards.
• Packages.
• Mail bags.

 
Here in California, mail theft is a misdemeanor offense under Penal Code (PC) 530.5e. This law makes it so that people who steal mail, such as porch pirates, face the following:

• Up to 1 year in jail.
• A max fine of $1,000.

 
This law also makes it so that people can be charged with other laws on top of this one. This means that a person accused of breaking this law could actually face harsher consequences as well.

Don’t Get Pirated This Holiday Season

The holiday season is all about giving, but porch pirates out there are only concerned with taking. Don’t fall victim to them. Follow the tips above to help prevent a porch pirate from walking off with a loved one’s Christmas gift this holiday season.

Have you ever been victimized by a porch pirate? Do you have any tips to avoid porch pirates that aren’t listed above? What about California’s take on mail theft? Are the consequences harsh enough, or does there need to be more of a deterrent against porch piracy?

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Commonly Broken California Laws

Commonly Broken California Laws

When it comes to breaking the law, there are all sorts of things that a person can to. There are literally thousands of different ways to break laws in California. Some of the most commonly broken laws in the state include:

Assault: This occurs when a person hurts another individual. This can be done with a fists or a weapon. Depending on how the person attacked the other individual, and how badly the person was injured, the crime can be either a misdemeanor or a felony. The bail amount for this crime varies depending on how it was charged and often starts around $25,000.
DUI: Driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol is an illegal act and yet thousands of people do it every single day. A first time offense can get a person a bail of around $5,000. Subsequent offense will earn higher bail amounts, up to $100,000 in worst case scenarios.
Possession of drugs: Possessing illegal drugs, items related to those drugs, or even prescription drugs without a prescription is illegal in California. Bail for drug possession charges can range anywhere from $20,000 to over $100,000.
Possession of weapons: Certain weapons are illegal in California, and some people are flat out prohibited from possessing any weapons. If a person is caught doing either one of those things, they will face this charge. Depending on the facts of the case, a person can face a bail amount ranging from $20,000 to $60,000.
Restraining order violation: When a restraining order is issued by a court, that person has to stay away from the person in question. Failing to do so can get a person into trouble. The average bail amount for a restraining order violation starts around $15,000.
Theft/burglary: Theft occurs when a person takes an item from someone else. Burglary occurs when a person breaks into a place and steals something. If less than $950 is stolen, than the crime is considered a misdemeanor. If more than that is stolen, than it is a felony. Bail amounts for these crimes can range anywhere from $20,000 to over $50,000.

Bail amounts vary from crime to crime and grow more expensive the more severe the crime is. Still, even the low ends of these bail amounts are too expensive for the average individual to afford on their own. This is why Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles is here to help. Contact one of our bail agents and they will provide you with an affordable bail bond that costs 10% of the full bail amount.

What are you waiting for? You can get started today by calling 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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What Documentation Is Required?

What Documentation Is Required?

People have a lot of questions when it comes to posting bail with a bail bond for the first time. Most people have never posted bail before and would like to get through the whole process as quickly as possible. They want this not just for their sake, but for the sake of their incarcerated loved one as well. After all, nobody wants a loved one to be stuck in jail.

A person can help speed up the bail bond process by having certain documents ready to go. Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we need the following documentation to setup a bail bond:

• A recent paycheck or pay stub.
• A piece of mail with home address for proof of California residency.
• A valid California ID.

 
If you have this information ready to go when you meet with a bail agent, it can help speed up the process of bailing out your loved one. That is all anybody wants.

Another way to help speed up the bail process is to have some co-signers ready to go before calling. Co-signers are important because they help share the responsibility of the bail bond. With multiple co-signers taking care of the bail bond, it reduces the pressure of paying for the bail bond.

Bail may be new to you, but with help from the professionals here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles you have nothing to worry about. Don’t panic if you don’t have all of this ready to go right away. Our bail agents will be more than happy to help you out and answer your questions about bail. You will not have to face this alone.

You can talk to a bail agent for free at any time by calling 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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Bail without Interest

Bail without Interest

Bailing a friend or family member out of jail is not something that most people have experience with. Unfortunately, people can get arrested at any time and a person may find themselves needing to bail out a loved one. When that happens, these people tend to have a lot of questions. One of the biggest questions is how much will it cost to bail the person out with a bail bond.

The answer to that question is dependent on what crime your loved one has been accused of. Different crimes receive different bail amounts. When it comes to the price of the bail bond that is dependent on the price of the bail. At Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail that they are for.

We can reduce the upfront cost of the bail bond by breaking it up and spreading it out over several months, up to 2 years. This way, instead of having to pay the full amount of the bail bond all at once, a person can take care of the cost in manageable chunks.

When it comes to payment plans, especially for large chunks of money, any interest rate can become very costly. That is why people worry about interest rates so much. Luckily for you, we do not charge interest on any of our bail bonds. Even our payment plans have 0% interest on them. This means that you only ever have to pay the cost of the bail bond and nothing more.

Some of the other services that we provide for our clients at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles include:

• 24/7 Bail bond service
• 20% Discount
• Phone approvals
• No hidden fees
• No collateral with working signer
• Se habla Español

 
Bailing someone out of jail can be a whole lot more affordable if you come to Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles for help. Our bonds only cost 10% of the bail they are for, and we let you pay them off with a 0% interest payment plan.

Are you looking to bail someone out of jail? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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Questions about Payments

Questions about Payments

When it comes to bailing someone out of jail, most people have a lot of questions. Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we have heard, and answered, all sorts of questions. The part of bail that causes the most concern amongst our clients, is paying for it. People have a lot of questions relating to paying for a bail bond, and so we’ve compiled a list of those questions, and their answers, to make things easier for you.

How much does a bail bond cost? How much a bail bond costs is dependent on how much your loved one’s bail is set at. Our bail bonds cost 10% of the bail they are for. This means that a $20,000 bail will have a $2,000 bail bond.

Are there any discounts? Yes, we do offer discounts for qualified clients. If one of the co-signers for the bail bond is a member of the military, a member of AARP, a union member, owns a home, or has a private attorney, then the person can get 20% off the price of the bail bond.

How do I make payments? We accept a number of different payment options to make paying for the bail bond easier. We accept cash, checks, credit cards, Western Union money transfers, E-checks, and Wells Fargo Business Account deposits. These payments can be made in person, online, over the phone, or even through the mail in some instances.

How much do I have to pay upfront? That is dependent on how big the bail is, and who the co-signers for the bail bond are. A smaller bail can lead to smaller monthly and down payments. Having good co-signers is another way to shrink the size of the payments.

How much is interest? 0%. We do not charge interest on our bail bonds.

Do I need collateral? In most cases, all we need for collateral is the signature of a working co-signer. If we have that, most times we won’t need any other type of collateral.

What happens if I miss a payment? We understand that life can get difficult at times, and so a missed payment is bound to happen. If you know in advanced that you are going to miss a payment, talk to one of our agents. We will be more than willing to work with you.

Paying for someone’s bail may seem intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. At Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, we do everything that we can to make paying for the bail bond as easy as possible.

If you have more questions about bail or bail bonds, feel free to get in touch with one of our agents. They are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and consultations are always free. There is no reason not to talk to one of our professional bail agents.

Are you ready to get started? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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California Loitering Laws

California Loitering Laws

Pretty much everyone has seen a sign telling people that loitering is prohibited in a certain area. However, not everyone knows or understands exactly what loitering means. On top of that, how much trouble can a person actually get into for loitering? Is it a big deal? The answer to that depends on how exactly the person was loitering.

Laws on Loitering Here in California

For those who don’t know, loitering is the act of lingering in a private or public place for no apparent reason. The key to this definition is that the person has no reason to be in the area. This means that if a person is hanging out waiting for someone, they are not actually loitering, even if it may appear that way to someone else.

Most businesses don’t like loiterers because they can scare off potential customers, but as it turns out, the act of loitering in and of itself is not a crime in the state of California. However, if the person is attempting to do something else while loitering, they can get into some legal trouble.

There are 5 different state laws that are concerned about loitering:

PC 303a “Loitering to solicit the purchase of alcohol” – It is a crime for a person to ask people to buy alcohol for them, especially when they’ve been cut off from a bar or are a minor.
PC 416 “Failing to disperse” – Failing to leave a place after being ordered to do so by a police officer is a type of loitering that can get a person in trouble. This is due to the fact that the officer has asked/ordered the person to leave and they have failed to do so.
Penal Code (PC) 602 “Trespassing” – Entering and lingering on someone else’s property without their permission can be seen as a type of loitering that can get a person into trouble.
PC 652b “Loitering at a school” – It is a crime to loiter at a school, or any other place where children often get together, if a person has no reason to be at that location, or they are planning to commit a crime such as kidnapping.
PC 653.22 “Loitering with intent to commit prostitution” – This one is pretty self-explanatory. Prostitution is illegal and so hanging around a place to commit prostitution is also illegal.

Basically, any time a person is hanging out in an area with the intent of committing a crime that is why they can get into trouble for loitering. It is the crime the person is planning to do that gets them into trouble, not so much the act of loitering.

Penalties for Loitering

If a person is accused of breaking any of the above loitering laws, they face misdemeanor charges. This means that a person faces the following penalties:

• Up to 6 months in county jail.
• A max fine of $1,000.
• Misdemeanor probation.

 
Most of the time, loitering isn’t a big deal, and as such, the consequences for the various loitering crimes are relatively light.

The Intent to Commit a Crime Is Illegal.

While hanging around a place for no apparent reason is not a crime, doing so with the intent of committing a crime is illegal. It is the intent a person has that can get them into trouble. As long as a person has a reason to be in an area, and hasn’t been asked to leave, they are typically within their rights to stay there.

What do you think about California’s laws surrounding loitering? Are they fair, or are they too small for the crime?

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Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

Making Bail Cheap and Affordable

When it comes to handling large expenses, people like to have options. This is especially true when it comes to bail. Even the cheapest bails in California cost several thousands of dollars. This is well out of reach of the average Californian. Luckily, there is a way to not only make bailing someone out of jail cheaper, but more affordable as well. All you have to do is contact Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles.

We have helped thousands of Californians deal with bail since our founding in 1987. Let us help you too. Coming to us for help means that you will only have to pay a fraction of the full bail price. This is due to the fact that our bail bonds only cost 10% of the bail. This makes the bail bond a whole lot cheaper.

Here at Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles we know that everyone is different. Things that work well for one person may not work well for others. That is why we accept a variety of payment options. We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards. On top of that, our clients can make their payments online, in person, over the phone, or through the mail. They can use whichever methods work best for them.

On top of that, we provide discounts for qualified clients. For instance, clients with approved credit can get their bail bond for 0% down. This way, they don’t have to make a payment until a month after their loved one’s release. Some clients can get an additional 20% off the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers:

• Is a union member.
• Is a military member.
• Is a member of AARP.
• Is a homeowner.
• Has a private attorney.

 
Paying for bail may initially seem like an impossible task, but it doesn’t have to be. Just contact Cal Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. We provide our clients with cheap bail bonds and options that make the bail bond more affordable too.

Do you need bail help? If so, call 877-793-2254 or click Chat With Us now.

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Minors Breaking the Law

Minors Breaking the Law

Everyone knows that kids get into trouble. Luckily, for the most part, kids tend to only get in trouble with their parents. As long as parents keep an eye on their children, and play an active role in the child’s life, the kid is less likely to wind up in serious trouble. However, that is not always the case. Sometimes kids mess up in a big way, and find themselves on the wrong side of the law.

Finding out that a child has broken a law is a terrible situation for a parent to deal with. No parent ever wants to answer the front door, or a phone, to learn that their child is in some serious trouble. While rare, this does happen from time to time. As such, a parent should be aware of what happens when a minor has a run in with law enforcement agents.

How the Law Handles Juveniles

When a minor gets in trouble with the law, officers react a little differently. In most cases, minors receive lesser penalties for crimes than an adult would. Still, there are times when a minor could find themselves locked up.

What happens to a minor who broke the law is largely dependent on the crime itself. If the charge is relatively minor, then the child will likely be allowed to go home, or be escorted home. Most of the time, the law prefers that parents take care of the children themselves. However, that is not always an option.

If things are a little more serious, then the minor may be given a summons to appear in court at a later date. If things are real bad, then the minor may be arrested and taken to juvenile hall.

Juvenile Hall

Just because a minor is taken to juvenile hall does not mean that they will be forced to stay there forever. This isn’t the end of the world.

A probation officer will look at the case and decide how to proceed. The officer can do one of the following:

• Give the minor a citation to appear in court and send him/her home.
• Place the minor on probation, which allows them to go home and avoid going to court, unless they continue to misbehave.
• Hold the minor in juvenile hall until a judge can look at the case.

 

Minors in Court

When dealing with courts, minors go to a separate court that focuses solely on minors. If a child has to go to a hearing in court, they could be going for any of the following reasons:

• Detention Hearing. This will determine if the child needs to stay in juvenile hall or not.
• Transfer Hearing. This will determine if the case will stay at this level, or be moved up to an adult court.
• Adjudication. This is the actual trial held in front of a judge, without a jury.
• Disposition Hearing. If the juvenile is found guilty, this is where they receive their sentencing.

 
Despite the fact that these court hearings are for minors, they are still very serious. A person should treat these hearings the exact same way they would any other court appearances. This means a person, especially the minor, should dress appropriately and behave while in the court.

Consequences of Court

The goal of the juvenile delinquency system is to rehabilitate minors and to help mold them into good, well-behaved individuals. As such, judges have a lot of options when it comes to sentencing any minor that is found guilty.

What is likely the best case scenario for a guilty verdict, is probation. This means the minor is able to go home. They just have to be on their best behavior to ensure they don’t receive a worse punishment. Some common probation conditions can include:

• A curfew.
• Going to counseling.
• Going to school.
• Making restitutions to the victims.
• Performing community service.

 
A worst case scenario would be when a judge determines that a child is better off away from their home. The child could become a ward of the state, which is where the state takes responsibility for the child. The minor could be placed into a probation camp, or into California’s Division of Juvenile Justice. Neither of these are great outcomes.

Be a Part of Your Child’s Life

No parent ever wants their child to have to face hardship, and getting into trouble with the law definitely counts as hardship. Luckily, a child has to screw up pretty majorly in order to wind up in juvenile hall. So long as a parent takes an active role in their kid’s life, they should be able to prevent that from ever happening.

When kids have guidance, they are able to make better choices, and therefore are less likely to end up getting into trouble in the first place. That is why parents need to pay attention to their kids. If they don’t, their child could make a bad choice and find him or herself in juvie.

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